Market Insight
SPRING 2017

Annual report
Year 2017

The Market Insight Fall 2017 report is not yet available and will be published in November 2017
The Market Insight Winter 2017-2018 report is not yet available and will be published in February 2018

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Inland navigation goods transport in Europe

 

Share of EU IWT performance in 2016 2016 vs 2015 (positive or negative evolution)
Belgium 7% Negative
Bulgaria 4% Negative
Czech Republic 0,03% Positive
Germany 37% Negative
France 6% Negative
Croatia 0,03% Positive
Luxemburg 0,13% Negative
Hungary 1,4% Positive
Netherlands 34% Positive
Austria 1,4% Positive
Poland 0,08% Positive
Romania 9% Negative
Slovakia 0,6% Positive

Source: Eurostat

 

IWT transport performance in 2015 and in 2016 in main EU IWT countries

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Eurostat

 

 

Quaterly transport performance evolution in main IWT EU contries

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Eurostat

 

 

Quaterly transport performance evolution in main ITW EU countries

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Eurostat

 

  • Inland navigation activity is very concentrated in Europe with two countries, Netherlands and Germany, representing 71% of total European transport performance on European inland waterways.
  • More generally, European Union Rhine countries (Belgium, Netherlands, France and Germany) represent 85% of total inland navigation goods transport performance; European Union Danube countries (Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Austria, Romania and Slovakia) represent 15% of goods transport performance on European inland waterways. And other countries represent today less than 0.5% of European goods transport by inland navigation.
  • The total IWT transport performance in the European Union reached nearly 145 billion TKM in 2016 and decreased by 1% compared to 2015, with the most important decrease from eight main IWT European countries being observed in Luxemburg, France and Germany, with respectively 19%, 2.5% and 1.7% decrease in transport performance in 2016 compared to 2015. Luxemburg and France in particular are two countries where inland navigation activity strongly relies on transport of agriculture products, and the bad harvests in 2016 therefore significantly impacted the inland navigation traffic in these two countries. Agricultural products transport represents 25% of inland waterways transport performance in France, and this transport decreased by more than 20% in 2016 compared to 2015 (Source: VNF data).
  • The evolution of transport performance in Germany and Netherlands also highlights the effect of the two periods of low water in the Rhine region at the end of 2015 and at the end of 2016. A difficult recovery of volume transported in 2016, especially on dry cargo segments, explains the transport performance decrease in Germany in 2016.
  • In Danube countries, despite bad harvest results in 2015 that impacted the transport performance at the beginning of 2016, especially in Romania, the steel industry maintained the level of transport performance in the region.
  • European Union countries with smaller weight in European inland navigation transport performance nonetheless experienced two-digit growth in 2016, showing the development of inland navigation in these countries. The IWT transport performance growth rate in Czech Republic, Croatia, Poland and Slovakia was indeed between 12% and 24% in 2016.

 

 

Inland navigation goods transport in main European river basins

 

TRANSPORT PERFORMANCE IN MAIN EUROPEAN RIVER BASINS

 

Yearly volume of goods transported on the Traditional Rhine

(Total volume in millions of tonnes)

Source : Destatis, CCNR

 

  • Despite better economic conditions, water conditions have recently not enabled the translation of economic activity catch-up into traffic volume increase. The volume transported on the Rhine remained stable in 2016 and the Rhine remains still by far the most important European basin per volume of goods transported, maintaining a share of 2/3 of European volumes transported by IWT on this river. And focusing on the “Traditional Rhine” (the Rhine between Basel and the Dutch-German border), transported volume already accounts for not far from 50% of the volume transported on European inland waterways.

 

 

Yearly volume of goods transported on the Moselle

(total volume in millions of tonnes)

Source : Destatis, CCNR

 

 

  • The Moselle runs from Eastern France to Germany, through Luxemburg, and inland navigation transport mainly relies on agricultural products, raw materials for the steel industry and more and more on container transport. The decrease of 24% of agricultural products volume transported on the Moselle in 2016 (due to bad harvest results in 2016) had a significant negative impact on the Moselle goods transport. Even though volumes are today more limited, Moselle traffic can however still count on dynamic container traffic. While it had doubled between 2014 and 2015, container traffic increased by 12% between 2015 and 2016.

 

 

Yearly volume of goods transported on the Mittelland Canal

(Total volume in millions of tonnes)

Source : Destatis, CCNR

 

 

  • The Mittelland canal is a link between East and West in Northern Germany, going from the Rhine region to the Oder region. Its construction started in 1906 and was aimed at providing a low-cost transportation mode for agricultural products from the surplus production region East of Berlin to very populated regions of West Germany. Since then the utility has diversified, linking industrial regions and main northern Europe sea ports. Volumes transported have been stable for 10 years with between 20 and 25 million goods passing every year through the canal.

 

 

Yearly volume of goods transported on the Seine basin

(total volume in millions of tonnes)

Source : VNF

 

 

  • With more than 20 million goods transported every year, the Seine river basin is the main river basin in France in terms of freight transport. The growth of the segment of container transport and of the segment of building materials transport compensated for the difficult year for agricultural products transport. Indeed, the total transport on the Seine increased by nearly 3% in 2016 compared to 2015. And this 2016 growth calls for positive expectations in 2017 with a recovery of the agricultural products transport segment and further dynamism on other segments.

 

 

Yearly volume of goods transported on the Rhône-Saône river basin

(total volume in millions of tonnes)

Source : VNF

 

 

  • The Rhône-Saône basin connects the East of France to the South of France, reaching the sea port of Marseille. It was strongly impacted in 2016 by the decrease concerning the transport of agricultural products. The volume of agricultural products transported decreased by 25% in 2016 and was not compensated by the largest segment on the Rhône-Saône which is the transport of building materials. This segment indeed also experienced a decrease in 2016 compared to 2015.

 

 

Yearly volume of goods transported on the Elbe

(total volume in millions of tonnes)

Source : Destatis

 

  • The river Elbe connects different German regions and the Czech Republic with the port of Hamburg. Via the Havel river, the Elbe is also linked to Berlin. By far the largest part of transport volumes are currently observed on the Lower Elbe, which is the stretch of the Elbe in the vicinity of the port of Hamburg. This hinterland traffic showed an upward trend from 2012, but the year 2016 saw a decrease compared to 2015 (decrease also observed for the total traffic in the Port of Hamburg in 2016). Detailed figures from the Statistical Office for Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein show that this decrease was mainly due to less agricultural products and foodstuff transport while liquid cargo (especially chemicals) registered an increase.
  • The container transport on the Elbe grew by only 1 % in 2016, compared to 16.7 % in 2015. It is expected that an upward tendency will evolve due to the willingness of the port of Hamburg to shift an increasing amount of goods traffic in its hinterland from road to rail and IWT.

 

 

 

 

 

IWW transport per type of goods in the Rhine area

 

 

Monthly IWT transport performance on the Traditional Rhine between 2013 and 2016

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Destatis, CCNR

 

 

Comparison of quarterly IWT transport performance on the Traditional Rhine

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Destatis, CCNR

 

  • The volume of goods transported on the Rhine was strongly impacted by the water levels in 2016. A low water period occurred at the end of 2015 between August and October, negatively impacting transport performance during the second semester of 2015. The first semester of 2016 witnessed a traffic catch-up, not reaching the levels of the first semester 2015. Comparing the first semester of 2016 to the first semester of 2015, a decrease in total transport performance of 4.9% can indeed be observed on the Traditional Rhine (and a decrease of 2.2% for the volume of goods transported). The second semester of 2016 also experienced a low water period on the Rhine, starting however later than in 2015. The impact on Rhine traffic can be observed only from October. These water conditions, more favorable than in 2015, enabled a transport performance increase of 4.8% during the second semesters of 2015 and 2016 (and an increase of 3.9% for the volume of goods transported).
  • Nevertheless, it is important to note that the transport performance measured on the Traditional Rhine during the second semester of 2016 is respectively 13% and 14% smaller than in 2014 and in 2013, showing the relative impact of low water periods at the end of 2016.
  • 2016 also showed how the sector is able to react to increase the volume of goods transported when the water conditions return to suitable conditions for inland navigation. November 2016 is an example with a monthly transport performance back to the average level of the four previous years while October 2016 had experienced a 25% decrease compared to that average level.

 

 

Quarterly IWT transport performance on the Traditional Rhine per type of transport segment

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : CCNR analysis based on national statistic offices data

 

 

  • All segments suffer from the low water periods but the evolution is different from one segment to another. Liquid cargo and container segments, for example, enjoyed a more dynamic catch-up in 2016, reaching greater levels of transport performance than in 2015. Both liquid cargo transport and container transport on the Rhine experienced their higher levels of quarterly transport performance over the last years in 2016, respectively during the first and second quarters of 2016. However, all segments were impacted to the same extent during the last quarter of 2016, with a decrease in transport performance ranging from 15 to 20% compared to the previous quarter.

 

 

Yearly evolution of volume of goods transported by IWT by type of goods in the Rhine area (yearly volume in thousand tonnes on the Traditional Rhine)

 

2015

(1000 t)

2016

(1000 t)

Variation

2016 vs 2015

Coal 30 453 30 923 2%
Mineral oil products 28 681 28 466 -1%
Ores 25 993 25 600 -2%
Building materials 23 994 24 107 0%
Chemicals 19 883 20 942 5%
Containers 19 758 20 475 4%
Agricultural products 20 603 20 057 -3%
Metals 11 138 10 727 -4%
Other 5 132 5 642
Total 185 635 186 939 1%

Source: CCNR analysis based on national statistic offices data

 

Yearly evolution of volume of goods transported by IWT by type of goods in the Rhine area

(yearly volume in thousand tonnes on the Traditional Rhine)

Source : CCNR analysis based on national statistic offices data

 

  • The transport of coal, mineral oil products and building materials has undergone similar development over the past four years. While the volume transported in 2016 was in the same order of magnitude compared to 2015 (between +2% and -1% for the evolution between 2015 and 2016), the volume transported in 2016 was significantly lower than in 2013 and in 2014. This is due to the fact that the low water periods, even if they were limited in time in 2016, were not compensated by dynamic activity during the rest of the year. Still, the long-term evolution appears to be quite different for these three segments. The volume of building materials transported on the Rhine has nearly been divided by two over the last 20 years, but an expected increase in the house building industry over the next years, especially in the Netherlands and in France, could support the transport of building materials. The decrease has not been as great for the mineral oil products segments but it also decreased from approximately 35 million tonnes transported 20 years ago to 28 million tonnes transported in 2016. This structural trend is due to a reduction in fuel consumption in the automotive sector and in house heating activities and is expected to be pursued. Coal transport on the Rhine has been pushed by the increasing coal import from Germany. But a shift in German energy public policies towards renewable energies has started to trigger a decrease in coal transport that is expected to continue over the next years.
  • Transport of chemical products and containers are two segments that have experienced a significant increase over the last 20 years. The volumes transported on the Rhine have almost doubled for chemical products and tripled for containers. The volumes are not even impacted so much during years experiencing low water periods; the volumes transported remained the same for chemical products in 2016 compared to years 2013 and 2014 and even increased for containers.
  • The situation of the transport of agricultural products is particular because it was strongly and negatively impacted by the bad harvest in 2016. This explains the decrease of close to 10% in 2016 compared to years 2013 and 2014. Apart from this conjectural event that impacted the agricultural product segment in 2016, the long-term evolution of transport of this type of goods is rather positive, being one of the most dynamic segments of the cargo segment over the last 10 years.
  • The comparison of the evolution of metals and ores transport is interesting because the transport activity for these two types of goods is mainly driven by the steel industry. Looking at the long-term past evolution, it appears that ores transport has decreased while metals transport has remained stable; this can be explained by the fact that the steel industry has increased the efficiency of use of raw materials[1]. But looking at the evolution since 2013, the ores transport evolution is positive while that of metals transport is not so positive (it should be noted that the evolution has a limited order of magnitude, +4% for ores transport between 2013 and 2016 vs +1% for metals transport). An explanation could be that the metals transport segment is more sensitive to modal shift towards road transport, in particular in periods of low water. Storage capability increase can be used more easily for ores than for metals because of quality issues.[2]

[1] Source: German Steel Industry association – report “Ways of efficiency in the steel industry” (2010)

[2] Source: Market Observation Report of the German Federal Office of Goods Transport

 

IWW transport per type of goods in the Danube area

 

 

Yearly evolution of volume of goods transported by IWT by type of goods in the Danube area (Yearly volume in 1000 tonnes on Middle Danube – Hungary/Croatia/Serbia transborder area)

 

 

2015
(1000 t)
2016
(1000 t)
Variation
2016 vs 2015
Agricultural products 2463 1591 -35%
Iron ores 933 985 6%
Metals 564 807 43%
Chemicals 629 620 -1%
Mineral oil products 613 465 -24%
Coal 605 433 -28%
Total 5807 4901 -16%

 

2015
(1000 t)
2016
(1000 t)
Variation
2016 vs 2015
Agricultural products 1483 1614 +9 %
Metals 757 910 +20 %
Iron ores 749 862 +15 %
Mineral oil products 564 763 +35 %
Chemicals 585 730 +25 %
Total 4138 4879 +18 %

 

 


Source : CCNR analysis based on Danube Commission data and market observation report

 

 

Yearly evolution of volume of goods transported by IWT by type of goods in the Danube area

(Yearly volume in 1000 tonnes on Middle Danube – Hungary/Croatia/Serbia transborder area)

Source : CCNR analysis based on Danube Commission data and market observation report

 

  • The transport of coal, mineral oil products and building materials has undergone similar development over the past four years. While the volume transported in 2016 was in the same order of magnitude compared to 2015 (between +2% and -1% for the evolution between 2015 and 2016), the volume transported in 2016 was significantly lower than in 2013 and in 2014. This is due to the fact that the low water periods, even if they were limited in time in 2016, were not compensated by dynamic activity during the rest of the year. Still, the long-term evolution appears to be quite different for these three segments. The volume of building materials transported on the Rhine has nearly been divided by two over the last 20 years, but an expected increase in the house building industry over the next years, especially in the Netherlands and in France, could support the transport of building materials. The decrease has not been as great for the mineral oil products segments but it also decreased from approximately 35 million tonnes transported 20 years ago to 28 million tonnes transported in 2016. This structural trend is due to a reduction in fuel consumption in the automotive sector and in house heating activities and is expected to be pursued. Coal transport on the Rhine has been pushed by the increasing coal import from Germany. But a shift in German energy public policies towards renewable energies has started to trigger a decrease in coal transport that is expected to continue over the next years.
  • Transport of chemical products and containers are two segments that have experienced a significant increase over the last 20 years. The volumes transported on the Rhine have almost doubled for chemical products and tripled for containers. The volumes are not even impacted so much during years experiencing low water periods; the volumes transported remained the same for chemical products in 2016 compared to years 2013 and 2014 and even increased for containers.
  • The situation of the transport of agricultural products is particular because it was strongly and negatively impacted by the bad harvest in 2016. This explains the decrease of close to 10% in 2016 compared to years 2013 and 2014. Apart from this conjectural event that impacted the agricultural product segment in 2016, the long-term evolution of transport of this type of goods is rather positive, being one of the most dynamic segments of the cargo segment over the last 10 years.
  • The comparison of the evolution of metals and ores transport is interesting because the transport activity for these two types of goods is mainly driven by the steel industry. Looking at the long-term past evolution, it appears that ores transport has decreased while metals transport has remained stable; this can be explained by the fact that the steel industry has increased the efficiency of use of raw materials[1]. But looking at the evolution since 2013, the ores transport evolution is positive while that of metals transport is not so positive (it should be noted that the evolution has a limited order of magnitude, +4% for ores transport between 2013 and 2016 vs +1% for metals transport). An explanation could be that the metals transport segment is more sensitive to modal shift towards road transport, in particular in periods of low water. Storage capability increase can be used more easily for ores than for metals because of quality issues.[2]

[1] Source: German Steel Industry association – report “Ways of efficiency in the steel industry” (2010)

[2] Source: Market Observation Report of the German Federal Office of Goods Transport

 

Yearly evolution of volume of goods transported by IWT by type of goods in the Danube area (Yearly volume in 1000 tonnes on Middle Danube – Hungary/Croatia/Serbia transborder area)

 

 

2015
(1000 t)
2016
(1000 t)
Variation
2016 vs 2015
Agricultural products 2463 1591 -35%
Iron ores 933 985 6%
Metals 564 807 43%
Chemicals 629 620 -1%
Mineral oil products 613 465 -24%
Coal 605 433 -28%
Total 5807 4901 -16%

Source : CCNR analysis based on Danube Commission data and market observation report

 

 

Yearly evolution of volume of goods transported by IWT by type of goods in the Danube area

(Yearly volume in 1000 tonnes on Upper Danube – Slovakia/Hungary transborder area)

Source : CCNR analysis based on Danube Commission data and market observation report

 

 

  • The transport of agricultural products constitutes the most important segment on the Danube, and is especially important for the middle Danube region, from which cereals are exported via the seaports at the Black Sea (Constanza) to countries in the Mediterranean Sea. It experienced difficulties during the first semester of 2016 because of bad harvests in 2015. The agricultural products transport therefore decreased by 35% in the middle Danube area in 2016 compared to 2015. This decrease concerning the segment of agricultural products is mainly due to the traffic levels during the first semester of 2016. The second semester of 2016 indeed experienced a catch-up of transport of agricultural products with better harvest results in 2016.
  • The steel industry is also a strong driver of inland waterways transport in the Danube region and this sector was particularly active in 2016. Giving some examples of the steel industry activity along the Danube, Voestalpine in Austria, Dunaferr in Hungary, Zelezara in Serbia, Arcellor Mittal in Romania and US Steel Kosice in Slovakia all useinland waterways transport to transport raw materials and final products.
  • The transport of metals, for instance, is mainly downstream on the Danube and enjoyed a 43% increase in the middle Danube and a 20 % increase in the Upper Danube area in 2016 compared to 2015. Also, the iron ores traffic, which is mainly upstream on the Danube, recovered strongly after the low water restrictions of 2015.
  • Container transport remains very limited in the Danube region. It represents only 0.5% of the total Danube traffic and it represents less than 0.2% of total container transport in the European Union on inland waterways.
  • The total volume of goods transported in the Middle Danube decreased in 2016 compared to 2015. But the decrease was mainly due to the agricultural products transport segment. The Upper Danube area (Austria, Slovakia) goods transport is more driven by the steel industry, with a weight of transport of agricultural products which is not as sizeable. And on this part of the Danube, there was an increase of the volume transported in 2016, an 18 % increase in 2016 compared to 2015 for the volume of goods transported by IWT through Gabcikovo, at the border between Hungary and Slovakia.

 

Inland navigation container transport in Europe

 

 

Distribution of container transport performance on inland waterways in 2016 in the European Union

in %

Source : Eurostat

 

 

Container transport performance on inland waterways in Europe

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Eurostat

 

  • Container transport on inland waterways is almost exclusively present in the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and France with a share of European Union transport performance higher than 99%.
  • Rhine area infrastructures and good connections with the two major European sea ports for container traffic, Rotterdam and Antwerp, partly explain dynamic container transport on inland waterways in the Rhine area.
  • Container traffic occupies a major place in the economy of inland navigation. On a European scale, over 15 billion TKM were transported by inland waterways in 2016, an increase of 31% over 10 years. Compared to 2015, the transport of containerized goods increased by 4.6%.
  • In 2016, the main containerized goods conveying countries in Europe saw their numbers increase by 6.4%, 4.2% and 2.7% respectively for the Netherlands, Germany and Belgium. France, on the other hand, was down by 6.1%.


 

 

Volume of containers transported on the Traditional Rhine over the last 20 years

(volume in TEUs)

Source : Destatis, CCNR analysis

 

 

  • 16% of the total transport performance on the Traditional Rhine was container transport in 2016
  • On the Traditional Rhine, the traffic of goods is mainly represented by trade between Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, France and the Netherlands, which accounted for more than 97% of freight transport on the Traditional Rhine in 2016.  Only 3% of the freight transport on the Traditional Rhine is either fluviomaritime transport heading to overseas destinations such as the United Kingdom or freight transport going through the Rhine-Main-Danube canal towards Danube countries. The share of the container in the transport of goods on the Traditional Rhine in 2016 was 16%.
  • Container transport on the Traditional Rhine has almost tripled in 20 years. This significant increase can be explained by the recovery in world trade, but also by the modernization of structures to facilitate the transport, loading and unloading of goods.
  • In 2016, more than 2.2 million TEUs were transported on the Traditional Rhine, an increase of 2% compared to 2015.

Distinction between full and empty containers carried on the Traditional Rhine in 2016

(Volume in TEUs)

Source : CCNR

 

  • 1,131,549 TEUs were transported downstream, while 1,093,717 TEUs were transported upstream. Subtlety is revealed by the distinction between full and empty containers.
  • Almost as many empty containers were transported downstream and upstream, but more than 943,000 full TEUs were transported downstream, or 83% of the total containers carried downstream. This imbalance between full and empty containers can be explained by the overall nature of trade in goods on the Traditional Rhine. Raw materials are generally imported into Europe and more particularly into Germany for the production and exportation of manufactured products in the rest of the world.

 

 

Container maritime traffic in the main European seaports

(TEUs)

Source : Eurostat

 

  • European container traffic on inland waterways is highly driven by the three largest European ports: Rotterdam, Antwerp and Hamburg.
  • Since 2000, transhipment of containers in each of these ports has doubled, or even quadrupled for the port of Antwerp, from 1.5 million TEUs to 3 million TEUs for Rotterdam, from nearly 1 million TEUs to more than 2.25 million TEUs for Hamburg and from just over 0.6 million TEUs to 2.5 million TEUs for Antwerp in 2016.
  • These significant increases are the result of world trade and globalisation. Besides, in Rotterdam and Hamburg, a slower growth process has been observed for maritime container traffic since 2009/2010, compared to the period before the economic crisis.
  • In Rotterdam, total maritime traffic decreased by 1.1% to 461 million tonnes in 2016, but container traffic had a small plus. The two new Container terminals at the ”Maasvlakte 2” experienced strong growth in the course of the year. In Antwerp, total maritime traffic increased slightly by 2.7% to 214 million tonnes in 2016, and container traffic even more so. In Hamburg, maritime traffic remained nearly constant, at 138.2 million tonnes (+0.3% in 2016). This volume included container traffic of 8.9 million TEUs (+1.0%).

 

Maritime container traffic in the main European seaports in 2016

 

Ports Mio tonnes in 2016 Rate of change Mio TEU in 2016 Rate of change
Rotterdam 127.1 +0.7 % 11.7 +0.8%
Antwerp 118 +4% 9.9 +5.6%
Hamburg 91.7 +1.2 % 8.9 +1.0%

Source: Eurostat, Destatis, CCNR

 

 

Volume of containers transported on German railways and on the Traditional Rhine

(TEU)

Source : Eurostat, Destatis, CCNR

 

 

  • Since 2005, yearly German railways container traffic has increased by 52% to 6.4 million TEU while hinterland traffic on the Traditional Rhine has increased by 13.7% to 2.2 million TEU. In the period 2005-2008, a strong increase was observed for the railways, while the fluvial remained constant. After the 2008 economic crisis, the traffic revival was faster for the fluvial sector, whereas it took three years for the German railways to regain pre-crisis traffic levels. In the period 2014-2015, container traffic experienced significant growth in the Port of Antwerp that benefitted to a greater extent the container traffic on the Rhine than on German railways. In 2016, German railways container traffic increased by 9.3%, while hinterland traffic on the Traditional Rhine increased by only 1.9%.

 

 

Modal split of container hinterland transport in the port of Rotterdam in 2016

in %

Source : Port of Rotterdam

 

 

Modal split of container hinterland transport in the port of Antwerp in 2016

Source : Port of Antwerp

 

  • In Hamburg, container Inland shipping had a modal split share of only 2.1%, which is a rather low share compared to the ports of Antwerp and Rotterdam. At least container inland shipping increased by 2.8 % in Hamburg in 2016 in terms of TEU (Source: Statistical Office for Hamburg / Port of Hamburg).
  • When a large network of waterways is accessible from the sea port, as is the case in the Netherlands and Belgium, inland waterways remain one of the most widely used modes of transport. This is the case of the Lower Rhine basin, which absorbs more than one-third of the containerized cargo from the ports of Rotterdam and Antwerp, while rail modal share lies around 10%.

 

 

 

Inland navigation and other modes of transport

 

 

Modal shares for goods transport in Germany

 

Share of transport performance for transport of all goods by mode of transport in Germany

(modal share in % of 2015 annual transport performance)

Source : Eurostat

 

 

Evolution of transport performance for all modes of transport in Germany (yearly total transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Eurostat

 

 

Yearly rate of change of total transport performance per mode of transport in Germany

(rate of change in %)

Source : Eurostat, CCNR analysis

 

 

Modal split in the main inland navigation port in Europe, the port of Duisburg*

(modal share in %)

Source : Duisport and Destatis

 

  • The share of inland navigation in total goods transport performance (including pipeline transport) is 11% in Germany. It is higher than the average throughout the European Union; Germany indeed enjoys a network of large waterways enabling a high level of inland navigation transport performance from the Elbe to the Rhine. Only two countries in Europe have greater weight of inland navigation in the share of total transport, the Netherlands and Belgium, with inland navigation shares reaching respectively 39% and 17% compared to rail and road transport.
  • Inland navigation has maintained its modal share in Germany since 2009 at the same level, oscillating between 11% and 13%. The modal share of inland navigation was actually almost the same in 2009 as in 2015. The main change compared to the situation in 2009 concerns the rail and road transportation modes. Between 2009 and 2015, the modal share of rail increased by three percentage points while the modal share of road decreased by almost three percentage points at the same time.
  • The slight changes concerning inland navigation modal share in Germany seem to be caused by the low water period. Indeed, the modal share of inland navigation remains above 12% except in 2011 and in 2015 when it went down to 11%, and these two years experienced periods of low water conditions that impacted the loading degree of inland navigation vessels. It seems that rail and road benefited from a modal shift during these periods because the growth rates of these two transportation modes were positive during these two years while volumes transported by inland navigation decreased. On the contrary, in 2012, inland navigation enjoyed a positive growth rate because of a catch-up phenomenon and, at the same time, the volume of goods transported by road and rail decreased, highlighting the fact that inland navigation could gain back its modal share.
  • The recent modal share evolution in the Port of Duisburg (biggest inland port in terms of volumes of goods transshipped in Germany and in Europe) also highlights the current relative dynamism of inland navigation in ports. The modal share in Duisburg Port increased in 2016 to nearly 42%.

 

Modal shares for goods transport in the European Union

 

 

Total inland navigation transport performance in the European Union per type of goods

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Eurostat

 

 

Iron ores transport performance evolution in the European Union

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Eurostat, CCNR analysis

 

 

Agricultural products transport performance evolution in the European Union

(transport performance in million TKM)

Source : Eurostat, CCNR analysis

 

  • The eight types of goods highlighted on the previous graph (iron ores, petroleum products, agricultural products, crude oil, chemical products, metals, foodstuffs and wastes) represent 97% of the total transport performance of inland navigation in the European Union.
  • The modal share of inland navigation can be very high for these types of goods, and inland waterways can almost be the exclusive mode of transport in some regions of Europe. The modal share (compared to rail and truck) can, for example, reach 90% for refined petroleum products in the Netherlands. And even at the European level, inland navigation maintains a significant market share for these types of goods despite constraints related to the availability of suitable waterways.
  • Taking a closer look at the two main dry cargo products transported by inland navigation in Europe, IWT has a modal share of approximatively 20% for iron ores and approximatively 10% for agricultural products at the European level (taking into account 15 EU countries with inland navigation activity).
  • The transport of iron ores is impacted by the worldwide competition faced by the European steel industry, and the volume of iron ores transported by all modes of transport in Europe has decreased since 2008. The decrease is particularly true for inland navigation because this mode of transport also experienced a decrease of the modal share from 19% to 17% between 2008 and 2015. The main beneficiary of the decrease was rail transport while road transport maintained a modal share right below 60%.
  • The transport of agricultural products is a more dynamic segment with continuous growth since 2008 for the total volume transported by all transportation modes. The modal share of IWT is smaller for agricultural products than for iron ores transport but the tendency in terms of modal share is more positive. Since 2008, the modal share of inland navigation has increased from 9.3% to 11.8% while both the modal shares of rail and road decreased over the same period.

Annual report
Year 2017

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WINTER 2017-2018

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