Market Insight
SPRING 2017

Annual report
Year 2017

Market Insight
FALL 2017

The Market Insight Winter 2017-2018 report is not yet available and will be published in February 2018

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Inland waterway traffic in three main European seaports

 

 

  • In Rotterdam, around 100 000 inland vessels frequented the port in 2016, compared to 110 000 vessels in 20151. Also, the volume of goods traffic by IWT decreased (-3 %) in 2016. IWT has very high shares in the hinterland traffic: 86 % for dry cargo, 40 % for liquid cargo and 36 % for containers. The port has the objective to increase this last share above the 40 % level.

1  Source: Port of Rotterdam website

Inland waterway traffic in the seaport of Rotterdam

(Million tonnes)

Source : Port of Rotterdam

 

 

  • In Antwerp, 58 006 inland vessels frequented the port in 2016, with goods traffic of 97.3 million tonnes (+6.3 %). Important IWT goods segments are liquid cargo (55 %) and machines & containerized goods (25 %). IWT traffic grew strongly in Antwerp over the past years: the level in 2016 was 13 % higher than in 2010. The overall modal share of IWT is almost 40 %.

 

 

Inland waterway traffic in the seaport of Antwerp

(million tonnes)

Source : Port of Antwerp

 

 

  • In Hamburg, 20 382 inland vessels frequented the port in 2016, transporting 11.5 mio. tonnes of cargo. Dry cargo (55 %) and liquid cargo (33 %) account for the majority, and containers for 10 %. The overall modal share of IWT stands at 11.5 %, which is clearly lower than in Rotterdam and Antwerp. This is due to the weak position of IWT in container traffic (2%), while IWT has a high modal share in liquid cargo traffic (40 %), and also in dry mass cargo traffic (20 %).

 

 

Inland waterway traffic in the seaport of Hamburg

(million tonnes)

Source : Statistical Office of Hamburg

 

 

  • The differences in the modal split between the western seaports (Rotterdam, Antwerp) and the port of Hamburg explain to a certain extent the differences in the inland shipping transport volumes in the respective hinterland regions: the Rhine region with its high volume of IWT traffic on the one hand, and the Elbe region with a relatively limited IWT transport level on the other hand.

 

 

 

 

Evolution of goods traffic in 2016 in European inland ports

 

 

Rhine ports

 

 

  • The following table and figure show the evolution of waterside goods traffic in the year 2016 compared to 2015 for the ten Rhine ports with the highest goods traffic. The rate of change for the total waterside traffic in these ports was around 2 % in 2016 compared to 2015.

 

 

Waterside goods traffic in ten major Rhine ports (million tonnes)

2015 2016 2016/2015
Duisburg 54.1 55.6 +3 %
RheinCargo* 17.4 18.1 +5 %
Mannheim 8.2 8.7 +6 %
Strasbourg 7.4 7.5 +1 %
Ludwigshafen 7.4 6.9 -7 %
Karlsruhe 6.5 6.2 4 %
Basel 6.3 5.9 7 %
Mulhouse 4.9 4.9 -1 %
Kehl 3.2 3.5 +7 %
Krefeld 3.0 3.2 +4 %
Total 118.4 120.5 +2 %

Source: Destatis and ports mentioned.

*RheinCargo is a multimodal port and logistics company that operates seven ports in Cologne, Neuss and Düsseldorf

 

 

Yearly rate of change of waterside goods traffic in major Rhine ports in 2016

(rate of change in %)

Source : Destatis and ports mentioned

 

 

  • Duisburg : Waterside goods traffic in the largest European inland port increased by almost 3 % in 2016, reaching a volume of 51.6 mio. tonnes. Within the modal split, inland shipping gained further market shares, reaching 42 %, while rail transport lost market shares down to 20 % and road transport maintained a market share of 38 % between 2015 and 2016. This high market share of IWT in goods traffic is due to the activity of the steel industry in Duisburg, which receives large amounts of raw materials (iron ore, coal) by ship.
  • In the largest European inland port, the port of Duisburg, inland waterside traffic has a share of 42 % of total traffic activities.
  • Cologne-Neuss-Düsseldorf : the port and logistics group RheinCargo operates seven ports in Cologne, Neuss and Düsseldorf, with waterside traffic of 18.1 mio. tonnes and total traffic (all modes) of 28 mio. tonnes in 2016. The modal split share of IWT was 65 % both in 2015 and in 2016. While river traffic increased in 2016, rail traffic lost 4 %. According to RheinCargo2, railway transport is faced with fierce competition from road transport, due to low fuel prices in the road transport sector since the end of 2014.
  • Mannheim : traffic was promoted by growth in mineral oil products and coal. In Kehl on the Upper Rhine, scrap steel for the local steelwork had a strong recovery, after the low water levels of the year 2015 which had hindered those transport flows.

2  Press release of RheinCargo from March 10th 2017

 

Container traffic in Rhine ports

 

 

  • For the container segment, the rate of change of the total waterside container traffic in the ten largest Container Rhine ports was 3 % in 2016 compared to 2015.

 

 

Waterside container traffic in ten major Rhine ports for containers

Port TEU 2015 TEU 2016 TEU 2016/2015
Duisburg 475 461 514 649 +8 %
RheinCargo * 303 955 298 373 -2 %
Germersheim 152 574 157 531 +3 %
Wörth am Rhein 125 817 127 729 +2 %
Mainz 111 522 126 206 +13 %
Mannheim 134 311 116 891 -13 %
Basel 102 916 114 498 +11 %
Emmerich 117 114 107 582 -8 %
Strasbourg 102 432 105 168 +3 %
Ludwigshafen 97 488 97 221 +/-0%
Total 1 723 590 1 765 848 +3 %

Source: Destatis and ports mentioned.

*RheinCargo is a multimodal port and logistics company that operates seven ports in Cologne, Neuss and Düsseldorf

 

 

Yearly rate of change of waterside container traffic (TEU) in the ten largest container ports on the Rhine in 2016

Source : Destatis and ports mentioned

 

 

  • The biggest European inland port, Duisburg, holds this position also in container traffic. In 2016, container transport represented 10.4 % of total waterside traffic in Duisburg, which amounted to 5.4 million tonnes3 and 514 649 TEU (+8 %). 20 foot and 40 foot containers are the two most common types, with a share of 43 % and 55 % of all containers handled.
  • As container shipping is part of international logistical chains, it is only logical to observe that 96 % of waterside container traffic in Duisburg is international traffic (50 % is export, and 46 % import). Export traffic goes mainly downstream on the Rhine to the ARA seaports (Amsterdam – Rotterdam – Antwerp), and 77 % of these export containers were loaded in 2016, and only 23 % were empty.4 This shows that inland waterway container traffic plays an important role for the exports of manufactured goods via the ARA seaports to overseas. Within the import traffic, the ratio of loaded to empty containers was 58 % loaded versus 42 % empty. This reflects that many empty containers are redirected by maritime container shipping companies to the terminals in the hinterland, in order to be refilled and used for exporting goods again. For the entire Traditional Rhine, a very similar structure to the one in the port of Duisburg is observable (see chapter on containers in this report).

3  Weight transported by container shipping includes the weight of the container boxes
4  Source: calculation CCNR based on Destatis data

 

Structure of waterside container traffic in the port of Duisburg

(thousands TEU)

Source : calculation based on Destatis

 

 

  • 77 % of all export container traffic in the port of Duisburg consists of loaded containers. For import container traffic, this share is 58 %. This shows that container traffic serves for the export of manufactured goods to oversea markets.

 

  • The export direction of container traffic is also important for two other big container ports on the Rhine: Germersheim and Wörth / Rhein – both at the Upper Rhine near Karlsruhe, only 20 km in distance from each other. Their waterside traffic is largely influenced by the presence of a German automobile company. In Wörth there is the world’s largest production site for trucks, and trucks are exported in components per container to overseas. In the port of Germersheim, the same company has a large storage centre for truck spare parts, from which wholesalers all over the world are supplied – by ship, train and truck.5
  • In the port of Mannheim, the decrease in 2016 was not caused by lower transport demand, but instead by the extension of the container terminal in order to absorb the increasing demand better in the future. Due to the extension work, the transshipment activity in 2016 was hindered.

5  www.media.daimler.com

 

French and Belgian inland ports

 

 

  • The rate of change of the total waterside port traffic in the ten largest French and Belgian inland ports was slightly positive in 2016 (+2%).

 

 

Waterside traffic in ten major French and Belgian inland ports (million tonnes)

2015 2016 2016/2015
Paris 20.3 20.3 +1 %
Liège 14.6 15.5 +6 %
Strasbourg 7.4 7.5 +1 %
La Louvière * 5.9 6.5 +9 %
Namur 5.1 5.2 -3 %
Brussels 4.4 4.3 -2 %
Metz/Thionville 2.5 2.0 -19 %
Lille 1.5 1.7 +9 %
Lyon 1.4 1.4 -2 %
Charleroi 1.6 1.4 -10 %
Total 64.7 65.8 +2 %

Source : ports data.

*Port Autonome du Centre et de l’Ouest (PACO)

 

 

Yearly rate of change of waterside goods traffic in the ten largest French and Belgian inland ports in 2016

Source : Ports data

 

 

  • The Port of Paris is, with a waterside traffic of more than 20 million tonnes per year, among the three biggest inland ports in Europe. In 2016, the two largest product segments (sands, stones and building materials; agricultural products) witnessed very different evolutions. While building materials increased strongly, promoted by large infrastructure work in Paris, grain traffic lost due to bad harvest results. Another French port, the port of Metz, where IWT has a modal share of 45 %, suffered even more from bad harvest results in 2016. Grain represents 92 % of total traffic in Metz, which explains the strong decline in 2016.
  • The Port of Liege is, after Duisburg, Paris and RheinCargo, the fourth largest European inland port. The increase of 6 % in 2016 came mainly from sands, stones & building materials (+2 %), metals (+10%), and wood pellets (+130 %). These pellets, imported from the Netherlands, are used as raw material by a biomass electricity power plant on the river Meuse. This plant is one of only two electricity plants in Belgium producing with biomass. Another example of the “green diversification” in the port is a new Bioethanol production site (BioWanze) on the river Meuse, which uses wheat and sugar beet (0.6 million t, + 16 % in 2016) as raw material for the production of alternative fuels.

 

  • According to data provided by the port, the modal split share of IWT in Liege had a positive trend in the last 20 years, and reached 75 % in 2016. The last time that the IWT modal split share in Liege was higher than 75 % was in the year 1990.

 

 

Modal Split in the port of Liege

Source : Port of Liege

 

 

  • In the Port of Lille, the strong traffic growth is explained by an increase in the segments of stones & building materials, metals and containers. This offset the reduction in agricultural products.

 

 

Container traffic in French and Belgian inland ports

 

 

  • The evolution of the waterside port traffic in the largest French and Belgian inland ports for container traffic was very positive in 2016 (+8 %). Examples are the dynamic growth in Brussels and Liege, where container traffic is growing thanks to active promotion by the port authorities. Positive evolutions are also the growing urban container transport in Paris, and the evolution of the port of Lille to a container hinterland hub for western seaports.

 

 

Waterside container traffic in major French and Belgian inland ports

TEU 2015 TEU 2016 2016/2015
Paris 163 916 161 261 -1 %
Strasbourg 102 432 105 168 +3 %
Liège 40 665 56 862 +40 %
Lille 44 352 50 929 +15 %
Brussels 19 465 29 895 +53 %
Mulhouse 30 438 28 690 -5 %
Total 401 268 432 805 +8 %

Source : ports mentioned

 

 

Evolution of waterside container traffic (TEU) in seven major French and Belgian container inland ports in 2016 compared to 2015

Source : ports mentioned

 

 

  • In the port of Brussels, a very dynamic evolution of container traffic has been present since 2015. According to the port, this can be explained by the arrival of a new operating company for the container terminal, which significantly increased the waterway activity of the terminal. About 40 % of goods transshipment per container in Brussels are metals. They are transported by container shuttle services between Brussels and the seaport of Antwerp.
  • Waterside container traffic increased by 40-53 % in 2016 in the inland ports of Liege and Brussels
  • The Port of Paris registered a waterside container traffic of 161,261 TEU in 2016. Although this represented a small decrease of 1.4 %, the positive aspect was further strong growth in the segment of urban container traffic on the river Seine of 14.6 %. Within this type of transport, food products for supermarkets are delivered by container barges on the rivers Seine and Oise in Paris. Container inland shipping had a modal split share of 33 % in total container traffic in the Ports of Paris in 2016, which was also its average share during the time period 2010-2016.

 

 

Structure of container transports on rivers in Paris

(thousands TEU)

Source : Ports de Paris. *container transport between Paris and Le Havre or Rouen

 

 

  • The Port of Paris launched initiatives to further promote urban container transport on the rivers Seine and Oise: installation of storage facilities for industrial companies, guidance and consulting of companies that are interested in shifting parts of their logistical activities from road to inland waterway traffic. The benefits for the city pf Paris consist of a reduction of emissions, fewer traffic problems and fewer accidents and related social costs.
  • In Paris, urban waterside container traffic is on an upward trend, promoted by a modal shift from road to IWT
  • The port of Lille reached a new record level in waterside container traffic in 2016. IWT has a modal share of 39 % in total container traffic. Lille is in a very favorable geographic position, as it is near to major seaports (Dunkerque, Calais, Antwerp), and can serve as a kind of hinterland hub for container traffic.
  • The port of Lyon, in the hinterland of the seaport of Marseille on the river Rhône, has two container terminals, depots for mineral oil products and also private port activities. In 2016, the overall waterside traffic decreased by 2 %, and the container traffic by 15 %. This was caused by too high water levels on the Rhône in the first half of the year, which prevented three-layer container transport between Marseille and Lyon. Besides, strikes in the port of Marseille (against the Loi Travail) had negative effects on the fluidity of the hinterland transport from Marseille and therefore on the port traffic in Lyon as well6.

6  Strikes against the new labour legislation in France were present in all French seaports (notably Le Havre, Marseille, Dunkerque) in 2016 and had a negative impact on the traffic not only in Lyon, but in Paris and Lille as well.

 

Danube ports

  • On the Danube, there are 20 ports with an annual goods traffic of more than 1 million tonnes per year. The following figures show the evolution in nine of the largest Danube ports between 2015 and 2016. The rate of increase of total waterside traffic in these ports was 9 %, which is due to the recovery of mass goods transports in 2016 after the low water period of 2015.

 

 

Waterside traffic in nine large Danube ports (million tonnes)

2015 2016 2016/2015
Izmael 4.8 5.7 + 18 %
Linz 3.8 4.0 + 5 %
Galati 3.0 3.3 +10 %
Bratislava 1.9 2.0 +3 %
Tulcea 1.5 1.5 +/- 0 %
Regensburg 1.5 1.3 -13 %
Vienna 1.0 1.1 +10 %
Budapest 0.8 1.0 +23 %
Reni 0.9 1.0 +11 %
Total 19.2 20.9 +9 %

Source : Danube Commission – Market Observation 2016

 

 

Evolution of waterside goods traffic in nine large Danube ports in 2016 compared to 2015

Source : Danube Commission - Market Observation 2016

 

 

  • The very positive evolution in the port of Budapest can be explained by strong growth of exports and imports of mineral oil products, to and from the lower Danube in Romania. Also in the port of Vienna, where mineral oil products make up 80 % of total traffic, this segment showed an increase in 2016 (+8 %) explaining the positive evolution in port traffic.
  • The Ukrainian sea-river port of Izmael on the lower Danube is very active in exporting iron ore and coal towards other Danube ports with high activity of the steel industry: Linz (Austria), Smederovo (Serbia) and Galati (Romania). Iron ore traffic is also dominant in the port of Bratislava (Slovakia), where these raw materials arrive by train and are transshipped to inland vessels, mainly to the Austrian port of Linz for the provision of the steel industry.
  • A negative evolution was witnessed for the traffic in the German Danube port of Regensburg. The cause was mainly the reduction in transshipments of foodstuff and agricultural products. In 2015, the port had received extra transshipment volumes for these products, as many vessels had to be made lighter in Regensburg, the reason being the low water levels on the German stretch of the Danube. In 2016 however, this extra transshipment was not present, as the water levels on the German Danube were higher.

 

EVOLUTION OF WATERSIDE TRAFFIC IN EUROPEAN INLAND PORTS

 

 

 

Specialization of inland ports per goods segment

 

 

  • The structure of the waterside traffic of most of the major European inland ports is characterized by a rather high degree of specialization on particular goods segment, for example on liquid cargo, building materials, the steel industry or agricultural products.
  • In many cases, this form of specialization is determined by regional industrial clusters, or the abundance of certain raw materials or agricultural products in the region surrounding the port. The following text gives an overview of these patterns, based on statistical data about waterside ports traffic in 2016 and 2015.
  • Two criteria were defined, for determining a high degree of specialization of a particular port for a certain goods segment: first of all, this goods segment should be the one with the highest share in total waterside traffic of the port. And secondly, the share of this goods segment should be at least 40 % of total waterside traffic.

 

 

Segment of sands, stones, gravel & building materials

 

 

  • The segment of sands, stones, gravel & building materials is very important for the inland ports in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. This is mainly due to the natural abundance of these materials in these countries. Among the ports with a high share of these materials are the second and the fourth largest inland port in Europe (Ports de Paris; Port autonome de Liège). Sands, stones and building materials can be transported between Belgium, the Netherlands and France via the waterways of the North-South axis. Unfortunately, for the inland ports in the Netherlands, no data for 2016 were available, but the ports were integrated in the map.

 

 

European inland ports with a specialization in sand, stones & building materials (2016 figures)

Port Sand, stones & building materials Total waterside traffic
Traffic volume (mio. t) Share in waterside ports traffic Evolution 2016 / 2015 Traffic volume (mio. t) Evolution 2016 / 2015
Paris (FRA) 15.0 74 % +9 % 20.3 +1 %
Liège (BEL) 6.7 43 % +2 % 15.5 +6 %
Namur (BEL) 4.8 93 % -3.5 % 5.2 -3 %
La Louvière (BEL)* 3.9 60 % +23 % 6.5 +9 %
Strasbourg (FRA) 3.4 46 % +14 % 7.5 +1 %
Brussels (BEL) 2.4 55 % +/- 0 % 4.3 -2 %
Charleroi (BEL) 0.8 59 % -5 % 1.4 -11 %
Lille (FRA) 0.7 42 % +3 % 1.7 +10 %
Total 37.7 +6.5 % 62.4 +3 %

Source : CCNR analysis based on ports data. * Port autonome du Centre et de l’Ouest

 

 

  • The traffic of sands, stones & building materials amounted to 37.7 mio. tonnes in these ports, which was an increase of 6.5 % compared to 2015. This product segment acted as growth driver in 2016, as can be seen from the comparison with the total growth rate in these ports (+3 %).
  • In Paris, dynamism is created by large infrastructure projects : the construction of new metro lines within the urban project “Grand Paris Express” is leading to an increasing transport demand for building materials, and inland shipping will be involved in the delivery of sand & building materials for this construction work. The port of Paris has signed an agreement with the public organisation Société du Grand Paris, which is in charge of carrying out the public transport work until the year 2030.
  • In many European inland ports, the traffic of sands, stones & building materials is promoted by large infrastructure projects, and by growing activity in the building industry.
  • The positive evolution in other ports can be explained by increasing building activity in the Netherlands and France, leading to more transport demand for sands, gravel and stones on the North-South axis. Most of the Belgian ports export large volumes of sand, gravel and building materials to the Netherlands and to France.

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - PARIS

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : Ports de Paris

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - LIEGE

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : Port autonome de Liège

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - STRASBOURG

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : Port autonome de Strasbourg

 

 

 

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - NAMUR

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : Port de Namur

 

 

Liquid cargo segment

 

 

  • Liquid cargo traffic is very important along the Rhine, with its clusters of refineries and chemical industries around Cologne and Ludwigshafen. Also the hinterland traffic from refineries in the ports of Rotterdam and Antwerp has to be considered, as the example of the Swiss Rhine ports in Basel shows: 42 % of the imports of mineral oil products of Switzerland are delivered on the Rhine to Basel (Source: Swiss Association for Crude oil and petroleum products).
  • Cologne is the biggest European transshipment place for this market segment. The RheinCargo ports group, which unites seven ports in Cologne, Neuss and Düsseldorf, had a liquid cargo traffic of 7.7 mio. tonnes in 2016. In addition to this, there are 1.8 mio. tonnes of liquid cargo traffic in private ports in Cologne.
  • Ludwigshafen is a centre for chemical products, with a traffic volume of more than 3.3 mio. tonnes per year. In 2016, chemical products had an increase of 2 %, but mineral oil products, accounting for another 1.5 mio. tonnes, registered a rather strong loss.
  • There are also inland ports on the Danube (Vienna), the Elbe (Magdeburg), and the western German canal network (Gelsenkirchen, Marl) with a specialization on the liquid cargo segment.

 

 

European inland ports with a specialization on liquid cargo (2016 figures)

Port Liquid cargo Total waterside traffic
Traffic volume (mio. t) Share in waterside port traffic Evolution

2016 / 2015

Traffic volume

(mio. t)

Evolution

2016 / 2015

RheinCargo (GER) 7.7 43 % +/-0 % 18.1 +3 %
Ludwigshafen (GER) 4.8 70 % -7 % 6.9 -7 %
Karlsruhe (GER) 4.2 67 % +4 % 6.2 -5 %
Gelsenkirchen (GER) 3.9 91 % +14 % 4.3 +12 %
Basel (SUI) 3.0 51 % -12 % 5.9 -7 %
Marl (GER) 1.6 47 % +3 % 3.4 +/-0 %
Magdeburg (GER) 1.5 47 % -6 % 3.1 -9 %
Krefeld (GER) 1.4 44 % +2 % 3.2 +4 %
Vienna (AUT) 0.8 79 % +8 % 1.1 +10 %
Total 28.9 -0.3 % 52.2 +0.2 %

Source : CCNR calculation based on Destatis and ports mentioned

 

 

  • In 2016, the total traffic for this goods segment stagnated more or less in all of the specialized ports, which was also the case if we look at the total waterside goods traffic in those inland ports.

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - RHEINCARGO

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : RheinCargo Steel industry segment (New Page)

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - LUDWIGSHAFEN

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : Port of Ludwigshafen Steel industry segment (New Page)

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - KARLSRUHE

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : RheinCargo, port of Ludwigshafen, port of Karlsruhe, Statistik Austria

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - VIENNA

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : RheinCargo, port of Ludwigshafen, port of Karlsruhe, Statistik Austria

 

 

Steel industry segment

 

 

  • The activity of the steel industry and its related waterside traffic is found alongside various rivers in Europe: the Rhine, Moselle, Saar, Danube, Belgian waterways. The public and private ports in Duisburg on the lower Rhine are by far the biggest transshipment places in Europe. The traffic in the steel industry makes Duisburg also the biggest European inland port. The steel industry in Duisburg receives most of its iron ore and coal from the port of Rotterdam – more than 33 mio. tonnes per year – by push convoys transported on the Rhine. The outgoing traffic (steel and steel products) accounts for another 8 million tonnes.
  • Large volumes of steel-related goods are also transshipped in many Danube ports (Izmael, Galati, Smederovo, Bratislava, Linz), in Saarlouis/Dillingen at the Saar and in Kehl on the Upper Rhine.

 

 

European inland ports with a specialization on the steel industry (2016 figures)*

Port Iron ore, coal, steel, scrap steel metals and metal products Total waterside traffic
Traffic volume (mio. t) Share in waterside port traffic Evolution

2016 / 2015

Traffic volume

(mio. t)

Evolution

2016 / 2015

Duisburg (GER) 40.7 73 % +2 % 55.6 +3 %
Izmael (UKR) 5.2 91 % +38 % 5.7 +17 %
Linz (AUT) 3.1 77 % +10 % 4.0 +5 %
Saarlouis (GER) 2.7 91 % -8 % 3.0 -11 %
Kehl (GER) 2.4 67 % +10 % 3.7 +7 %
Bratislava (SVK) 1.2 60 % +3 % 2.0 +3 %
Total 55.3 +4.8 % 74.0 +4 %

Source : CCNR calculation based on Destatis, Statistik Austria and Danube Commission. * for the Danube ports Galati and Smederovo with a high share of steel-related products, no detailed figures were available.

 

 

    • In 2016, this segment registered an overall growth of almost 5 % in the specialized ports. This was slightly higher than the rate of increase for the total inland waterway traffic in these ports. The steel segment acted therefore as a growth driver for European ports traffic in 2016.

 

  • The Danube ports increased their waterside traffic in 2016 for iron ores and coal mainly due to better water level conditions in comparison to 2015. Similar effects were also present on the Upper Rhine, as this stretch of the Rhine had also suffered from low water levels in 2015.

 

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - DUISBURG/RHINE

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : Destatis, Statistik Austria, Danube Commission

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic - IZMAEL/DANUBE

(% based on tonnes – 2016 figures)

Source : Destatis, Statistik Austria, Danube Commission

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic (% based on tonnes – 2016 figures) LINZ/DANUBE

Source : Destatis, Statistik Austria, Danube Commission

 

 

Share of products in waterside ports traffic (% based on tonnes – 2016 figures) BRATISLAVA/DANUBE

Source : Destatis, Statistik Austria, Danube Commission

 

 

Other goods segments – Container, Agricultural products, Coal

 

 

  • Container ports can mainly be found along the Rhine, and important examples are the ports of Germersheim, Wörth am Rhein or Emmerich. In these ports, container traffic has a share of 80 %, 67 % and 60 % of total traffic respectively. But other container ports exist outside the Rhine: in the port of Lyon, container traffic has a share of around 60 %. In northern Germany, the port of Braunschweig at the Mittelland-Canal lies in the hinterland of the seaport of Hamburg, to which it is connected via the Elbe-Seiten-Canal. In 2016, Braunschweig registered 53 359 TEU, which represents about 50 % of total goods traffic.
  • Agricultural products are strongly present in the Danube region, and especially on the middle Danube in Hungary. The port of Budapest is the main example, and other smaller Hungarian Danube ports (e.g. Baja) follow. In Western Europe, the French port of Metz is highly specializedion grain, with a traffic volume of 1.4 million tonnes in 2016, representing 92 % of the traffic in Metz alone. A related segment is the traffic of foodstuff. A port with a high volume of foodstuff traffic is the RheinCargo port of Neuss, with 3 million tonnes in 2016, and the port of Mannheim with 1.5 million tonnes in 2016. However, in both ports, the share of this segment is nevertheless lower than 40 %.
  • Coal is often related to the steel industry, but it can also be related to the energy sector. The number of ports with a specialization in the energy segment is in fact very limited. There are only two cases, namely in the German capital, Berlin, and in Hamm, at the Datteln-Hamm Canal in the Ruhr area. In Berlin, coal had a waterside traffic of 3.7 million tonnes in 2016 (57 % of waterside traffic), which was related to the provision of a major power plant for heating energy by inland shipping. But this coal traffic is expected to vanish almost completely from 2017 onwards, due to the decision of the energy company to end the use of brown coal due to environmental concerns. In general, the future of coal as an energy resource and as a transport good is questioned by the transition towards renewable energies.

EUROPEAN INLAND PORTS AND THEIR SPECIALIZATION

 

Annual report
Year 2017

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Market Insight
WINTER 2017-2018

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