MARKET INSIGHT
APRIL 2019

Annual report
2019

MARKET INSIGHT
NOVEMBER 2019

THEMATIC REPORT
2019-2020

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1. Freight traffic on inland waterways and in ports

• The overall development of IWT in Europe in the third quarter of 2018 was affected by the low water period which occurred in the second half of the year.

• In the third quarter of 2018, transport performance on European inland waterways reached 32.1 billion TKM.

• This transport performance represented a decrease of 14.9 % compared to the third quarter of 2017, including -27% for the traditional Rhine, -36% for its affluents and -10% for the Danube.

 

Transport performance in Europe

TRANSPORT PERFORMANCE IN IWT ON THE NATIONAL TERRITORY OF EACH COUNTRY IN EUROPE – COMPARISON
BETWEEN Q3 2017 AND Q3 2018
(TRANSPORT PERFORMANCE IN MILLION TKM)

Source: Eurostat [iww_go_qnave], OECD, National Statistical Offices, CCNR

INLAND WATERWAY TRANSPORT PERFORMANCE ON THE RHINE, RHINE AFFLUENTS*, DANUBE**, BELGIAN AND DUTCH WATERWAYS (TRANSPORT PERFORMANCE IN MILLION TKM)*

Source: Destatis, StatBel, Eurostat [iww_go_qnave], OECD, calculation CCNR
*Rhine affluents: Main, Mosel, Neckar, Saar
**Danube: Transport performance in Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria.

CH 1 Figure 1 1 Inland waterway transport on the Rhine Rhine affluents Danube Belgian and Dutch waterways

 

 

  • Due to the long-lasting and extreme low water situation in Europe in summer and autumn 2018, transport fell in many parts of Europe in Q3 2018, but there were some exceptions. On the lower Danube, which has a share of 75 % of total Danube transport performance, the result was higher (+2 %). On the Middle (-38 %) and Upper Danube (-48 %), however, the decline was considerable. The lower Danube (Romania, Bulgaria) was able to perform well because the draught of inland vessels was not restricted by the available water depth due to the river-sea-character of the fairway between the port of Braila and the Black Sea. The port of Galati is located in this river-sea-stretch (see section on ports and chapter 3).
  • The total transport performance on the Dutch waterways is largely affected by the Rhine performance (due to hinterland traffic from the Dutch and Belgium seaports to Germany and further upstream). The impact of low waters on the national transport performance was less severe than for the Rhine and its IJssel branch, as the water depth on waterways such as in the ARA region (between Antwerp, Rotterdam and Amsterdam) acted as a stabilizer.
  • On the traditional Rhine, 38.2 million tonnes were transported in Q3 2018, representing 18 % less cargo transport compared to Q3 2017. Container transport fell by 20 %, liquid cargo by 16 % and dry cargo by 14 %. It must be taken into account that the Middle and Upper Rhine, which were much more affected by low water levels than the Lower Rhine (see also chapter 2), have a share of 42 % of the total liquid cargo transport performance (along the Middle Rhine, large chemical industrial complexes are present) on the traditional Rhine and its affluents.
  • Similarly, the Middle and Upper Rhine’s share within total container transport performance on the traditional Rhine and its affluents is 49 %, a much higher deal than for dry cargo, which therefore explains the rather strong decrease of container transport by 20 % on the whole traditional Rhine.
  • On the Main, 3.5 million tonnes were transported in Q3 2018, which signifies 1 million tonnes less IWT (-23 %). For the year 2018 in total, figures from the Directorate General for Waterways and Shipping (GDWS) point to a reduction of around 20 %.
  • On the Moselle, 1.73 million tonnes in Q3 2018 were registered (1/3 less than in Q3 2017). Figures from the GDWS indicate -16.4 % for the total year 2018.
  • The Saar witnessed the strongest decrease of all Rhine tributaries. Its traffic was cut almost by half: 0.58 million tonnes in Q3 2018 compared to 1 million tonnes in Q3 2017. GDWS figures indicate -28 % for the total year 2018.

 

Container transport on the Rhine – An origin-destination analysis

 

  • On the traditional Rhine, 1.76 million TEU were transported in the first three quarters of 2018. The intensity of container transport hereby differs according to the stretches of the Rhine. The highest intensity is on the Lower Rhine section, with 1.73 million TEU. On the Upper Rhine, 0.67 million TEU were transported (the TEU values for the Lower and Upper Rhine cannot be summarised as this would lead to double-counting). Where do these containers come from and where do they go? The following figures shed light on this topic.

 

 

CONTAINER TRANSPORT ON THE UPPER RHINE ACCORDING TO COUNTRY OF LOADING AND UNLOADING

Source: calculation CCNR based on data from Destatis and from Port of Strasbourg, Port of Mulhouse

CH 1 Figure 1 2 Container transport on the Upper Rhine according to country of loading and unloading

 

 

  • It can be observed that containers are sent from German, Swiss and French Rhine ports to the seaports in Belgium and the Netherlands. For container transport on the Upper Rhine, Belgian seaports receive more TEU from the hinterland than Dutch seaports. On the Lower Rhine, the lead of Belgium is small, but still exists for container export traffic coming from the hinterland.

 

 

CONTAINER TRANSPORT ON THE LOWER RHINE ACCORDING TO COUNTRY OF LOADING AND UNLOADING

Source: calculation CCNR based on data from Destatis and from Port of Strasbourg, Port of Mulhouse

CH 1 Figure 1 3 Container transport on the Lower Rhine according to country of loading and unloading

 

 

  • For the import direction (containers coming from the seaports and going to Rhine ports in Germany, France, Switzerland), the seaports in the Netherlands send more TEU to the hinterland than the Belgian ports: for the Lower Rhine, there are twice as many TEU coming from the Netherlands, and arriving in Germany, than TEU coming from Belgium and arriving in Germany. For the Upper Rhine, this ratio is 1.4: 1 in favour of the Netherlands (for 10 TEU coming from Belgium, 14 come from the Netherlands).

 

 

Container transport on the Rhine – Share of filled containers per country of loading

 

  • Information about the share of filled and empty containers per country of loading is also available. For the Upper Rhine, the results are shown in the figure below.

 

 

SHARE OF FILLED CONTAINERS ON THE UPPER RHINE ACCORDING TO COUNTRY OF LOADING (IN %)

Source: calculation CCNR based on data from Destatis

 

CH 1 Figure 1 4 Share of filled containers on the Upper Rhine according to country of loading

 

 

  • In the first three quarters of 2018, 87.2 % of the containers that were loaded in French Rhine ports were filled with goods, and only 12.8 % were empty. For containers loaded in German and Swiss Rhine ports, the share of filled containers is also above the 80 % level.
  • For containers loaded in the Netherlands and in Belgium, less than one half of all containers were filled with goods. For the Upper Rhine, on average, the ratio was 68 % for filled containers against 32 % for empty containers.
  • These different values mirror to a large extent the export of goods from the Upper Rhine region to destinations abroad, and the import of empty containers from abroad (back to the ports along the Upper Rhine where they can be re-filled with goods for export purposes).
  • The same calculation for the Lower Rhine indicates that the share of filled containers remains high for France, Germany and Switzerland as countries of loading. The share of filled containers that were loaded in Belgium and the Netherlands is however rising.

 

 

SHARE OF FILLED CONTAINERS ON THE LOWER RHINE ACCORDING TO COUNTRY OF LOADING (IN %)

Source: calculation CCNR based on data from Destatis

 

CH 1 Figure 1 5 Share of filled containers on the Lower Rhine according to country of loading

 

 

Transport volume in main IWT countries in Europe

 

INLAND SHIPPING TRANSPORT VOLUME IN MAIN EUROPEAN IWT COUNTRIES (QUARTERLY DATA – MILLION TONNES)

Source: Eurostat [iww_go_qnave] and National Statistical Offices

CH 1 Figure 1 6 Inland shipping transport volume in main European IWT countries

 

 

Dry bulk, liquid bulk and container transport

 

RATE OF CHANGE IN INLAND SHIPPING TRANSPORT VOLUME (TONNES) IN FOUR MAJOR IWT COUNTRIES (Q3 2018 VS Q3 2017 – %)*

Source: Source: CBS, Destatis, StatBel, Romanian Institute of Statistics
* In Romania, container transport is at a very low level and is therefore not depicted in the graph. The container data for Belgium are provisional.

CH 1 Figure 1 7 Rate of change in inland shipping transport volume in four major IWT countries

 

 

  • In Germany, dry cargo’s share is 56 %, liquid cargo represents 25 % and container transport 12 %. Packaged and other cargo accounts for the remaining shares. The variations per goods segments are the following (in Q3 2018 compared to Q3 2017): metals (-22 %), chemicals (-16 %), coal (-8 %), iron ore (-13 %), agricultural products (-14 %), sand & stones (-16 %). Export traffic lost 22 %. Import traffic fell by 14 %, and national traffic by 7 %.
  • In the Netherlands, dry cargo’s share is 56 %, liquid cargo represents 30 % and container transport 14 %. In Q3 2018 compared to Q3 2017, export of dry bulk fell by 8 %, export of liquid bulk by 9 % and export of containers by 6 %. National traffic was resilient: dry bulk traffic increased by 4 %, liquid bulk by 2 % and container traffic by 8 %.
  • In Romania, dry cargo has a share of 95.1 %, liquid cargo 4.6 % and container transport 0.2 %. Transport activity was very robust, due to specific natural conditions (see chapter 3). The dry cargo sector benefitted from a 28 % increase of iron ore transport. Sands, stones and construction materials increased by 11 %. The largest product segment which is grain remained relatively stable (see chapter 3)(based on transport volumes (in t), grain is the largest segment in Romania, while it is iron ore, based on TKM).

 

 

Waterside transport in European ports

 

WATERSIDE TRANSSHIPMENT VOLUME IN Q1-Q3 2017, WATERSIDE TRANSSHIPMENT VOLUME IN Q1-Q3 2018 AND RATE OF CHANGE BETWEEN BOTH

Source: Destatis (German ports), Danube Commission (Austrian, Slovakian and Serbian ports), Hungarian Central Statistical Office (Hungarian ports), Romanian Institute of Statistics (Romanian ports), and ports data (for all other ports)
* Data for the ports of Liège and Metz include the 4 quarters of 2017 and 2018.

 

 

MARKET INSIGHT
APRIL 2019

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Annual report
Year 2019

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MARKET INSIGHT
NOVEMBER 2019

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MARKET INSIGHT
THEMATIC REPORT 2019

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